Tag Archives: svn

Author: (no author) not defined in authors file

I came across the following error message

Author: (no author) not defined in authors file

when I tried to import an SVN repository (Open Yahtzee‘s) to Git using git svn and I specified an authors file (using -A). Indeed, the first commit to the svn (which was done using cvs2svn) had no username for the commiter. Apperantly the workaround is to add the following line to your author file.

(no author) = no_author <no_author@no_author>

I tried also doing the same without an email address, but it just didn’t work. It seems Git requires that all authors have an email address.

Backup a SourceForge hosted SVN repository – sf-svn-backup

SourceForge urges their users to backup the code repositories of their projects. As I have several projects hosted with SourceForge, I should do it too. Making the backups isn’t complicated at all, but because it isn’t automated properly, I’ve been lazy with it.

sf-svn-backup was written in order to simply automate the process. The script is pretty simple to use, just pass as the first argument the project name and the script will write down to stdout the dump file.

For example:

sf-svn-backup openyahtzee > openyahtzee.dump

The project name should be it’s UNIX name (e.g. openyahtzee and not Open Yahtzee). Because the script writes the dump file directly to stdout it’s easy to pipe the output first through a compression program such as gzip to create compressed SVN dump files.

Delete Unversioned Files Under SVN

Sometimes svn switch fails because unversion files exist in the working copy, and the need to erase them comes up. This is also true when updating to an old revision (usually one that misses directories that exist in the head revision), doing some work (like compiling), and then trying to update back to the head revision. Subversion (SVN) will fail complaining that directories/files already exist.
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Creating Local SVN Repository (Home Repository)

In this tutorial I will explain how to create a local Subversion (SVN) repository, intended for a single user. I assume that you already know the benefits of keeping track of old revision of projects or important documents such as a resume or a thesis you have been writing. Subversion offers you a very convenient yet strong method to do so, and the easiest way to do so with Subversion (SVN) is to create a local, home, repository intended for a single user – you.
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